The city has clear boundaries.
It also has a unique rhythm of life, air, flora and fauna. It influences the countryside, but is also influenced by it: feeds on it, expands into, fills up with nostalgia and romanticism, looms over. The city is fearful and detached from anything that does not fall into the definition of a city. In maps, areas surrounding cities, anonymous and painted green, are adorned with highways and roads - leading towards the city. Sometimes, there are marks of farms, whose produce the city enjoys. However, at large, those areas seem to remain without a clear identity, with the exception of road marks, beneficial to urban residents predominantly. Nature from the countryside sometimes dares to enter the city and is inevitably affected by it. The city needs countryside's nature and its resources: water, minerals and territories for growing food.

On the one hand, the countryside is a foreign land; but on the other, the countryside has a strong tendency not to remain within its' limits, whether in terms of natural resources or human ones. 
The relationship between the city and its countryside is defined by diffusion, dependence, parasitism, dominance and subdual, violence, gentleness and romance. This project is an attempt to provide an allegorical interpretation of this relationship. 
My interpretation of a city and countryside map is akin to a fabric dyeing device. The device consists of a central upper part, symbolizing the city, where one can drip liquid pigment. The pigment seeps into the hanging parts beneath it, representing various stations outside the city. The typographic arrangements on the poles are based on Georges Perec's writings (Hebrew translation), and receive new visibility following the dyeing process. The act of dyeing is primitive and starts with a controlled human action. However, the end result is beyond my control and hence, rather unpredictable. There is a material contrast between artificial and natural - Plexiglas, polyester and artificial pigment along with natural cotton threads and water.

The final work reflects the processes of dyeing, diffusion, and their ultimate outcome.
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